You're Invited:Meet the Socket Team at BlackHat and DEF CON in Las Vegas, Aug 7-8.RSVP
Socket
Socket
Sign inDemoInstall

re-use-form

Package Overview
Dependencies
2
Maintainers
1
Versions
26
Alerts
File Explorer

Advanced tools

Install Socket

Detect and block malicious and high-risk dependencies

Install

re-use-form

Easy-to-use React form hooks with built-in validation support


Version published
Maintainers
1
Created

Readme

Source

React Form Hook

Simple and robust form hook for React with validation support and simple internationalization.

npm version

Installation

npm install --save re-use-form

Usage

Input Prerequisites

re-use-form provides a useForm hook that is intended to be used alongside with custom Input components. An Input is any component that consumes three properties: value, error and onChange (note that there is also name property supplied for input by form's helpers). It also has to provide it's value as first argument to onChange function supplied in props (see "Custom onChange Input Handler" section bellow for more info and examples).

useForm Hook

useForm hook is primary hook provided by the package. It accepts an optional configuration object that can be used to specify form's initial attributes, client-side validations (see "Form Validations" section bellow) and to ease internationalization of error messages by providing default validation options.

import { useForm } from 're-use-form';
import { TextField, Select } from 'my-components/inputs';

function MyForm({ onSave }) {
  const { input, attrs } = useForm(); // initializes form attributes with empty object.

  const save = () => onSave(attrs);

  return (
    <>
      <TextField {...input('email')} label="Email" />
      <TextField {...input('fullName')} label="Full Name" />

      <Select {...input('address.countryId')} options={countryOptions} label="Country" />
      <TextField {...input('address.city')} label="City" />
      <TextField {...input('address.line')} label="Address" />

      <button onClick={save}>Submit</button>
    </>
  );
}
Note on $ alias for input helper.

useForm hook returns an object that has both input and $ properties with the same value. While input is more explicit name, it might become cumbersome to use it over and over again. For this reason, useForm hook also provides a $ helper that does the same. Basically, it's the same approach as used in react-form-base package. All examples bellow will use $ helper method as more common one.

Keep in mind that although $ is available by default, you can use any alias you find convenient when destructuring form helpers object returned by hook:

const { input: inp } = useForm();

// and then you can use `<Input {...inp('name')} />`

Hook Config

useForm hook accepts a config as it's only argument. This config object is used to specify form's initial values, client-side validations (see "Form Validations" section bellow), their dependencies, etc. This config object is memoized with no dependencies by default. For dynamic configuration one should use useConfig hook (see bellow).

Bellow are examples of useForm hook call with different config examples:

const { $ } = useForm({
  initial: {
    username: '',
    items: [{}]
  },
  validations: {
    username: 'presence'
  }
});

In cases when validation setup needs to share common options for all validation rules (like for internationalizing error messages, see corresponding section bellow), you can specify defaultOptions within validation setup:

const { t } = useTranslation('common');
const { $ } = useForm({
  validations: {
    defaultOptions: { t },
    rules: {
      username: 'presence'
    }
  }
});

To apply a dynamic configuration, for instance, input value-dependent validation, one can use useConfig helper hook. It has the same signature as useMemo hook, and should it's function provide a config object, it will be merged with the configuration form already has:

const { $, useConfig, attrs: { guest } } = useForm({
  initial: { username: '', address: '', guest: false }
});

useConfig(() => {
  return !guest && {
    validations: {
      username: 'presence',
      address: 'presence'
    }
  };
}, [guest]);

Custom onChange Input Handler

The most common use-case when you need custom logic is to have custom onChange handler for handling any input's change. For this, $/input function takes this function as second attribute. This function will be called with input value as first argument and an object with meta information as second one. As a bare minimum, this object will have name property that corresponds to input's name (the string value passed to $/input function call), and other properties can be populated by your input components:

function TextField({ value, error, onChange, ...rest }) {
  const handleChange = useCallback((e) => {
    onChange(e.target.value, { event: e });
  }, []);

  return (
    <div>
      <input value={value} onChange={handleChange} {...rest} />
      { error &&
        <div className="error">{ error }</div>
      }
    </div>
  );
}

function Form() {
  const { $, set } = useForm();

  // uppercases user's input and logs event provided by TextField input component
  const changeInput = useCallback((value, { name, event }) => {
    console.log(event);
    set(name, value.toUpperCase());
  }, []);

  return (
    <>
      <TextField {...$('username', changeInput)} label="Username" />
      <TextField {...$('address.postalCode', changeInput)} label="Postal Code" />
    </>
  );
}

Purity Support

All of the helper functions returned by useForm hook, with the exception of get and getError functions that depend on form attributes and errors whenever they change, are persistent and do not change on per render basis. The same goes for values returned by $/input helper - as long as on-change handler passed to $ function is persistent (or if it was omitted), it's onChange property will be persistent as well, i.e. pure input components that consume it won't be re-rendered if other properties do not change too.

If, for some reason, you want to disable input onChange handlers persistence, you can use pureHandlers: false config option.

Note on Validation-less Forms

Before we go to validation section bellow, it should be mentioned that even forms without defined client-side validation can use getError, setErrors and setError helpers returned by form hook. With no client-side validation, you might still want to interact with the server when user works with form and should something go wrong, you might want to set server-side errors for form's inputs and use them in form's rendering logic, which is exactly what mentioned helpers are about.

Form Validations

re-use-form provides a very easy way to declare form validations, which will automatically validate inputs on change when required.

Vanilla JS Functions

It is always possible to pass a function, or array of functions as input validation rule. Each validator function will be called with input value as first argument, and object of validation options as second one. By default, this object will have input name and attrs properties. This function should return an error if input's value doesn't pass validation logic:

function presence(value) {
  if (!value) return 'Cannot be blank';
}

function UserForm() {
  const { $, validate } = useForm({
    validations: {
      username: presence
    }
  });
  // ...
}

Since it's very common to have additional validation options, at least customizable message, the easiest way to achieve this is to have validator-generating functions that accept additional options and pass them to validator function they return:

function presence({ message }) {
  return (value) => {
    if (!value) {
      return message || 'Cannot be blank'
    }
  }
}

function format({ pattern, message }) {
  return (value) => {
    if (!value) return;

    if (!pattern.test(value)) {
      return message || 'Invalid format';
    }
  }
}

function UserForm() {
  const { $, validate } = useForm({
    validations: {
      username: [
        presence({ message: 'Please enter username' }),
        format({ pattern: /^[a-zA-Z0-9]{3,}$/, message: 'Only alphanumerics are allowed, min 3 symbols' })
      ]
    }
  });
  // ...
}
defValidation Helper

re-use-form also allows to predefine named validation rules via defValidation helper function call. Just like validators described above, validation handler function used in this call should accept two arguments - input's value and validation options. As already mentioned, by default, re-use-form will pass form attributes as attrs option, and name of the input being validated as name option. Even if not used very often, this may become in handy when defining custom wildcard validations that depend on other values of the form. Also, the most common use case scenario is to allow user to specify custom error message when validation is failed.

import { defValidation } from 're-use-form';

// Bellow are very primitive validations defined for demonstration purposes.
// All validation rules should be defined only once on your app initialization.
defValidation('presence', (value, { message }) => {
  if (!value) {
    return message || 'Cannot be blank';
  }
});

defValidation('email', (value, { message }) => {
  if (!value) return;

  if (!/.+@.+/.test(value)) {
    return message || 'Should be a valid email address';
  }
});

defValidation('format', (value, { pattern, message }) => {
  if (!value) return;

  if (!pattern.test(value)) {
    return message || 'Invalid format';
  }
});

With generic validations defined, they can be used in form hook (alongside with custom function validations, if needed)

// UserForm.js
// ...other imports...
import { useForm } from 're-use-form';

function UserForm() {
  const { $, validate } = useForm({
    validations: {
      'email': ['presence', 'email'],
      'fullName': 'presence',
      'address.city': [
        'presence',
        (value) => {
          if (!value) return;

          if (!/^[A-Z]/.test(value)) {
            return 'Should start with capital letter';
          }
        }
      ],
      'address.line': {
        presence: true,
        format: {
          pattern: /^[\w\s\d\.,]+$/,
          message: 'Please enter a valid address'
        }
      }
    }
  });

  const save = useCallback(() => {
    validate()
      .then((attrs) => {
        // Do something on successful validation.
        // `attrs` is identical to `get()` helper call
      })
      .catch((errors) {
        // Do something if validation failed. At this moment
        // errors are already rendered.
        // It is safe to omit this `.catch` closure - no
        // exception will be thrown.
      });
  }, []);

  return (
    <>
      <TextField {...$('email')} label="Email" />
      <TextField {...$('fullName')} label="Full Name" />

      <Select {...$('address.countryId')} options={countryOptions} label="Country" />
      <TextField {...$('address.city')} label="City" />
      <TextField {...$('address.line')} label="Address" />

      <button onClick={save}>Submit</button>
    </>
  );
}

It's up to you how to define validation rules. But as for suggested solution, you might want to take a look at validate.js project and adopt it's functionality for validation definitions.

Validation Dependencies

Sometimes your inputs can have custom validation that depends on values of other inputs. In such cases, when form is in "validate on change" state, validation rules on dependent inputs should be triggered whenever their dependencies change. Such validation with dependencies is defined by using object with rules and deps properties, where rules specify any acceptable validation rules, and deps is an array of dependency input names.

For example:

function ItemForm() {
  const { $ } = useForm({
    validations: {
      min: ['presence', 'numericality'],
      max: {
        rules: [
          'presence',
          'numericality',
          (value, { attrs }) => {
            if (value <= attrs.min) {
              return 'Should be greater than \'min\'';
            }
          }
        ],
        deps: ['min']
      }
    }
  });
}

And now, if form has any errors rendered, max input will be validated whenever its min dependency input changes.

Validation Wildcards and Index Capture

If your form deals with collections of items, it is possible to declare validation for them using wildcards:

function OrderForm() {
  const { $ } = useForm({
    initial: { items: [] },
    validations: {
      'email': ['presence', 'email'],
      'items.*.name': 'presence',
      'items.*.count': {
        presence: true,
        numericality: { greaterThan: 10 }
      }
    }
  });

  // ...
}

It is also possible to specify dependencies for wildcard validation:

function OrderForm() {
  const { $ } = useForm({
    initial: { items: [] },
    validations: {
      'items.*.id': 'presence',
      'items.*.min': 'presence',
      'items.*.max': {
        rules: [
          'presence',
          (value, { name, attrs }) => {
            const index = +name.split('.')[1];

            if (value <= attrs.items[index].min) {
              return `Should be greater than ${attrs.items[index].min}`;
            }
          }
        ],
        deps: ['items.*.min']
      }
    }
  });
}

Keep in mind, though, that such wildcard dependency means that change of any min input will trigger validation of every max input. If such behavior is not desired, one might want to use pinned validation dependencies by using "pin" ^ symbol instead of wildcard *:

function OrderForm() {
  const { $ } = useForm({
    initial: { items: [] },
    validations: {
      'items.*.id': 'presence',
      'items.*.min': 'presence',
      'items.*.max': {
        rules: [
          'presence',
          (value, { name, attrs }) => {
            const index = +name.split('.')[1];

            if (value <= attrs.items[index].min) {
              return `Should be greater than ${attrs.items[index].min}`;
            }
          }
        ],
        deps: ['items.^.min']
      }
    }
  });
}

Such dependency means that change of 'items.1.min' input would trigger validation only for corresponding 'items.1.max' input.

As can be seen from the example above, in some cases custom validation functions rely on item index when validating collection item. To ease it's access one may use validation rule with index capturing. When used, corresponding property will be added to validation options:

function OrderForm() {
  const { $ } = useForm({
    initial: { items: [] },
    validations: {
      'items.*.id': 'presence',
      'items.*.min': 'presence',
      'items.(index).max': {
        rules: [
          'presence',
          (value, { index, attrs }) => {
            if (value <= attrs.items[index].min) {
              return `Should be greater than ${attrs.items[index].min}`;
            }
          }
        ],
        deps: ['items.^.min']
      }
    }
  });
}

Asynchronous Validation

Starting from version 3.9.0, re-use-form provides support for asynchronous validation. Following basic rules apply for async validation:

  • async validation is executed only if "local" (non-async) validation yields no errors.
  • async validation functions have to return Promise objects that reject with an error message in case if validation fails.
  • all async validation routines are executed in parallel.
  • async validations are not executed as part of validation onChange strategy (see bellow), i.e. they can be called only explicitly via validate() or validate(inputName) helper function calls.

Since re-use-form has to know which validations are asynchronous ones, they have to be declared within async property of validations config object, like so:

defValidation('checkEmail', (value, { message }) => {
  if (!value) return;

  apiClient.checkEmail(value)
    .then((data) => {
      if (!data.isValid) {
        return Promise.reject(message || data.message || 'This email cannot be used');
      }
    })
});

function UserForm() {
  const { $ } = useForm({
    initial: { email: '', fullName: '' },
    validations: {
      rules: {
        email: 'presence',
        fullName: 'presence'
      },
      async: {
        email: 'checkEmail'
      }
    }
  });
}

With such setup, async checkEmail validation will be executed whenever validate helper is called with no arguments (to fully validate form attribues) or as validate('email') to validate email input standalone.

NOTE: when validating form, standard validation errors will be rendered immediately without waiting for async validations to finish their work. However, validation promise object, returned by validate helper, will be settled only when all async validations are settled.

In order to get the status on ongoing async validation, one can use validating object provided by form helper. If there is nothing being validated at the moment, the value of this property will be null to allow validating && ... shortcuts.

Dealing with multiple async errors

Since re-use-form will trigger all async validations in parallel, one might be interested in all of received error messages, not only in the first one, which is rendered by default. This behavior can be controlled by errorsStrategy async validation config property:

function UserForm() {
  const { $ } = useForm({
    initial: { email: '', fullName: '' },
    validations: {
      rules: {
        email: 'presence',
        fullName: 'presence'
      },
      async: {
        rules: {
          email: ['checkEmailUniqueness', 'checkEmailBlacklist']
        },
        errorsStrategy: 'join'
      }
    }
  });
}

The possible values are:

  • 'takeFirst' (default) - renders only first error message.
  • 'join' - joins all error messages with semicolon ('; ') string.
  • a custom function that takes errors array as the only argument and returns a single error message string.
Skipping async validation

Since at the end of the user flow all async-related validation may have been already passed, one may decide to avoid additional calls on final submit. This can be done by passing options object to validate helper function call with async property set to false:

const handleSubmit = () => {
  validate({ async: false })
    .then((attrs) => sendRequest(attrs));
}

This works for standalone input validation as well: validate('email', { async: false }) to trigger only "local" input validations.

withValidation Helper

It's pretty common to perform some action as soon as form has no errors and validation passes. For such case there is withValidation helper that accepts a callback and wraps it in validation routines. This callback will be called only if form had no errors:

const { $, withValidation } = useForm({
  validations: {
    name: 'presence'
  }
});

const save = withValidation((attrs) => {
  // send `attrs` to server
});

return (
  <>
    <Input {...$('name')} />
    <button onClick={save}>Submit</button>
  </>
);
Validation onChange strategy

By default, form will validate input values onChange only if there are any errors rendered on the form. This might not be the most suitable behavior in some cases. To specify other behavior one can use onChangeStrategy validation configuration option:

const { $ } = useForm({
  validations: {
    onChangeStrategy: 'onAfterValidate',
    rules: {
      username: 'presence'
    }
  }
});

Following strategies are supported:

  • 'onAnyError' - default one. Will validate inputs on change only if form has any errors.
  • 'onAfterValidate' - form will validate values on change only if validate helper has been called. This flag is set to initial false value after reset helper call.
  • 'onAnyChange' - form will validate inputs immediately on any change. Keep in mind that it means that user might see error messages before they finished entering their input. This especially takes place when using validation with dependencies.
  • 'none' - form will not validate inputs on change, but will drop any errors rendered on this input on change.

Form Partials (usePartial Helper Hook)

One of the features of re-use-form package is that it's useForm hook also provides a usePartial helper, which is a hook itself, and can be used to define "nested" forms with their own validation and other business logic. This can help you improve code organization and extract independent parts into dedicated components for better maintainability.

function OrderForm() {
  const { $, get, validate, usePartial } = useForm({
    initial: { username: '', items: [{}] },
    validations: {
      username: 'presence'
    }
  });

  return (
    <div>
      <Input {...$('username')} />
      { get('items').map((item, i) => (
          <ItemForm key={i} usePartial={usePartial} index={i} />
        ))
      }
      <button onClick={validate}>Validate</button>
    </div>
  );
}

function ItemForm({ usePartial, index }) {
  const { $ } = usePartial({
    prefix: `items.${index}`,
    validations: {
      name: 'presence',
      count: {
        rules: [
          'presence',
          (value, { attrs }) => {
            if (attrs.username === 'guest' && +value > 10) {
              return 'Guests are not allowed that many';
            }
          },
          (value, { attrs }) => {
            if (attrs.items[index].name === 'rare item' && +value > 1) {
              return 'Only one rare item is available';
            }
          }
        ],
        deps: ['username'],
        partialDeps: ['name']
      }
    }
  });

  return (
    <div>
      <Input {...$('name')} />
      <Input {...$('count')} />
    </div>
  );
}

As can be seen in example above, usePartial's configuration object should specify attributes prefix, instead of form initial attributes. Also note that when specifying validation dependencies, full name of dependency should be specified, since partial's validation might depend on "root" form attributes.

To specify "local" dependencies that are related only to inputs governed by usePartial hook, one should use partialDeps configuration key. It is only available when used together with usePartial hook.

Also note that "Dedicated Form Hook" feature bellow, which appeared later than form partials, might provide even more convenient form usage and code organization.

When called, usePartial hook returns object with following properties: attrs, get, set, getError, input, $ (alias of input). All of them are "scoped" to prefix of the partial and have similar behavior in terms of usage.

Dedicated Form Hook

It is also possible to define a form hook that can be available in any of your components without need to pass form helper functions in props. To do this, one can use makeForm helper function:

const [FormProvider, useOrderForm] = makeForm({
  initial: { username: '', items: [{}] },
  validations: {
    'username': 'presence',
    'items.*.name': 'presence',
    'items.*.count': 'presence'
  }
});

function OrderForm() {
  const { $, attrs } = useOrderForm();

  return (
    <div>
      <Input {...$('username')} />
      { attrs.items.map((item, i) => (
          <ItemForm key={i} index={i} />
        ))
      }
      <FormControls />
    </div>
  );
}

function FormControls() {
  const { reset, validate } = useOrderForm();

  return (
    <div>
      <button onClick={reset}>Reset</button>
      <button onClick={validate}>Validate</button>
    </div>
  );
}

function ItemForm({ index }) {
  const { $ } = useOrderForm();

  return (
    <div>
      <Input {...$(`items.${index}.name`)} />
      <Input {...$(`items.${index}.count`)} />
    </div>
  );
}

function OrderEditor() {
  const { t } = useTranslation('common');
  const config = useMemo(() => ({
    validations: {
      defaultOptions: { t }
    }
  }), []);

  return (
    <FormProvider config={config}>
      <OrderForm />
    </FormProvider>
  );
}

makeForm function accepts configuration object as it's single argument. As can be seen from the example above, generated FormProvider component also accepts an options config object that can be used to append configuration options that cannot be declared during makeForm function call (such as values returned by other hooks). It is OK to use any configuration object, including additional validations, alongside with new validation dependencies - everything will be merged into original config. The only dependency of resulting config object is the config from props, so make sure to memoize it to prevent unnecessary resolving on each render.

Controlled Form

When using dedicated form hook, it is also possible to work with the form in a controlled fashion:

function OrderEditor() {
  const [attrs, setAttrs] = useState(initial);

  const fillForm = useCallback(() => {
    setAttrs({
      username: 'Guest',
      address: 'Home'
    });
  }, []);

  return (
    <>
      <FormProvider attrs={attrs} onChange={onChange}>
        <OrderForm />
      </FormProvider>
      <button onClick={fillForm}>Prefill form</button>
    </>
  );
}
FormProvider props
  • config - additional config that will be merged into the one specified in makeForm call.

  • attrs - form attributes that are stored and provided from external source.

  • onChange(attrs) - function that will be called whenever form attributes are requested to be changed (via set function call, for instance).

  • onSet(setAttrs, { attrs, nextAttrs }) - function that will be called whenever attrs are assigned to the form from external source. This function received setAttrs function as first parameter and { attrs, nextAttrs } object as second one. setAttrs function has to be called to complete the sync of external attributes and form attributes. This function can be called with additional options object. The only supported option is validate:

const onSet = useCallback((setAttrs) => {
  setAttrs({ validate: false });
}, []);

return (
  <FormProvider
    attrs={attrs}
    onChange={onChange}
    onSet={onSet}
  >
    <OrderForm />
  </FormProvider>
);
Additional Helpers

In makeForm use-case scenarios there might also be a need in some additional custom form helpers. For this purpose, one can use helpers config option. It's value should be a function that accepts existing helpers as it's only attributes and returns object with additional helpers that will be merged with existing ones.

const [FormProvider, useOrderForm] = makeForm({
  helpers: ({ attrs }) => ({
    isNew: !!attrs.id
  })
});

And then in any of your form components:

const { $, isNew } = useOrderForm();

Internationalized Validation Error Messages

Depending on adopted i18n solution in your application, there are different ways of internationalizing validation error messages. The most common ones would include global t function and hook-based t function.

Global t Function

Projects like ttag give you a global t function with gettext-like usage. Probably, this approach provides the most simple and easy-to-use way to internationalize error messages:

import { defValidation } from 're-use-form';
import { t } from 'ttag';

defValidation('presence', (value, { message }) => {
  if (!value) {
    return message || t`Can't be blank`;
  }
});
Hook-based t Function

Frameworks like react-i18next provide translation hooks to be used within components themselves. In case of react-i18next we have a useTranslation hook, which provides access to t function. Since this function is locally scoped to component, it should be passed to validation options explicitly. Luckily, useForm hook allows to provide default validation options to have this t function specified only once without need to explicitly mention it over and over again:

import { defValidation } from 're-use-form';

defValidation('presence', (value, { t, message }) => {
  if (!value) {
    return message || t('errors.cannot_be_blank');
  }
});

And then in form:

import { useForm } from 're-use-form';
import { useTranslation } from 'react-i18next';

export function Form() {
  const { t } = useTranslation('common');
  const { $ } = useForm({
    validations: {
      defaultOptions: { t },
      rules: {
        username: 'presence',
        email: ['presence', 'email']
      }
    }
  });

  // rest of component
}

Hook helper object

useForm hook returns object with following properties:

  • useConfig(fn, deps) - helper hook used to declare dynamic form configuration that depends on dynamic values (external variables or form's input values).
  • $(name), input(name) - returns a set of properties for input with a given name. name is a dot-separated string, i.e. 'foo.bar' (for bar property nested in object under foo), or 'foos.1' (value at index 1 of foos array), or 'foos.2.bar' (bar property of object at index 2 of foos array).
  • attrs - corresponds to form's current attributes.
  • get(name) - returns a value for a given name. For example, if you have an attributes like {foos: [{bar: 'baz'}, {bar: 'bak'}]}, you might have:
    • get('foos') // => [{bar: 'baz'}, {bar: 'bak'}]
    • get('foos.1') // => {bar: 'bak'}
    • get('foos.1.bar') // => 'bak'
    • get() // returns whole form's attributes object
  • set(name, value) - sets a value for an input with a specified name.
  • set(attrs) - when object is provided, sets multiple values at once. Each key in the object corresponds to input name, and values are input values.
  • set(fn) - uses fn to fetch updates. fn takes current form attributes as only argument and should return object with updates to be assigned to the form (just like when calling set(attrs)).
  • getError(name) - returns validation error for an input with a given name.
  • setErrors(errors) - sets errors (object) as form's errors. Returns a Promise object that is resolved (with errors object) when errors are rendered.
  • setError(name, error) - sets an error for a single input with a given name. Just like setErrors, returns a promise that is resolved with an errors object with one key-value pair of input name and error message.
  • dropError(name) - drops error for a single input with a given name. Essentially calls setError(name, undefined).
  • isValid - boolean flag indicating whether or not there are any errors currently set.
  • isPristine - boolean flag indicating whether or not form attributes were changed. Gets back to true on reset helper call.
  • validate([options]) - performs form validations. Return a promise-like object that responds to then and catch methods. On successful validation, resolves promise with form attributes. On failed validation, rejects promise with validation errors. It is safe to omit catch clause - no exception will leak outside. Optional options argument can be used to skip asynchronous validations if one was defined by passing { async: false } as options.
  • validate(name, [options]) - validates a single input. Just like form validation, can be chained with then and catch callbacks. On successful validation, resolves promise with input value. On failed, rejects promise with errors object containing single key-value corresponding to input name and error. Just like with full-scaled validation, optional options attribute can be used to avoid async validation defined on an input.
  • validations - an object of the form { inputName: [<Promise>] } that represents ongoing async validations at the moment. If there are no async validations running, will have value of null.
  • withValidation(callback) - returns a function that performs form validation and executes a callback if there were no errors.
  • reset([attrsOrFn]) - clears form errors and sets form attributes provided value. If no value provided, uses object that was passed to initial useForm hook call. If function is provided, current form attributes are passed as the only function argument and it is expected to return full object of attributes to be set (unlike set method that should return object of updates in similar case). One can use this behavior to amend "clean" form attributes without affecting it's pristine state.
  • usePartial(config) - helper hook used to define form partials.
  • setState(fn) - helper hook that allows update form internal state. fn takes current form state as it's only argument and should return new complete form state. For advanced usage only.

More Convenient Usage

It is recommended to re-export package functionality from some part of your application, alongside with your inputs. For instance, you might have /components/form/index.js file with following content:

export * from 're-use-form';
export * from './inputs';

And then in your logic components you might have:

import { useForm, Input } from 'components/form';

License

MIT

Keywords

FAQs

Package last updated on 18 Apr 2022

Did you know?

Socket

Socket for GitHub automatically highlights issues in each pull request and monitors the health of all your open source dependencies. Discover the contents of your packages and block harmful activity before you install or update your dependencies.

Install

Related posts

SocketSocket SOC 2 Logo

Product

  • Package Alerts
  • Integrations
  • Docs
  • Pricing
  • FAQ
  • Roadmap
  • Changelog

Packages

Stay in touch

Get open source security insights delivered straight into your inbox.


  • Terms
  • Privacy
  • Security

Made with ⚡️ by Socket Inc