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validation.ts

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validation.ts

Validation for TypeScript

    0.0.30latest

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validation.ts

Validation for TypeScript

This module helps validating incoming JSON, url params, etc in a type safe manner.

validate

Every validator has a validate function which returns a Result (either a {type: 'ok', value} or a {type: 'error', errors})

A validated value can be transformed at any point during the validation process (e.g. isoDate).
Errors are accumulated.

import { errorDebugString, isOk } from 'validation.ts' const myValidator = ... const result = myValidator.validate(myJson) if (isOk(result)) { console.log(result.value) } else { console.error(errorDebugString(result.errors)) }

In case of errors, The Result contains an Array of { message: string, context: string } where message is a debug error message for developers and context is the path where the error occured (e.g root / data / 0 / name)

errorDebugString will give you a complete debug string of all errors, e.g.

At [root / c] Error validating the key. "c" is not a key of { "a": true, "b": true } At [root / c] Error validating the value. Type error: expected number but got string

primitives

import * as v from 'validation.ts' v.string v.number v.boolean v.null v.undefined v.isoDate

tagged primitive

Sometimes, a string or a number is not just any string or number but carries extra meaning, e.g: email, uuid, userId, KiloGram, etc.
Tagging such a primitive as it's being validated can help make the downstream code more robust.

type UserId = string & { __tag: 'UserId' } // Note: You can use any naming convention for the tag. const userIdValidator = v.string.tagged<UserId>()

literal

import { literal } from 'validation.ts' // The only value that can ever pass this validation is the 'X' string literal const validator = literal('X')

array

import { array, string } from 'validation.ts' const validator = array(string)

tuple

import { tuple, string, number } from 'validation.ts' const validator = tuple(string, number) // Tuple2

object, literal union, optional

import { string, object, union, optional } from 'validation.ts' const person = object({ id: string, prefs: object({ csvSeparator: optional(union(',', ';', '|')) }) })

Note: For bigger unions of strings, consider using the keyof validator instead.

dictionary

A dictionary is an object where all keys and all values share a common type.

import { dictionary, string, number } from 'validation.ts' const validator = dictionary(string, number)

keyof

import Set from 'space-lift/object/set' import { keyof } from 'validation.ts' const keys = Set('aa', 'bb', 'cc').value() const keyValidator = keyof(keys) keyValidator.validate('bb') // Ok<'aa' | 'bb' | 'cc'> = Ok('bb') // keyof typeof keys === typeof keyValidator.T === 'aa' | 'bb' | 'cc'

map, filter, flatMap

import { string, Ok } from 'validation.ts' const validator = string .filter(str => str.length > 3) .map(str => `${str}...`) .flatMap(str => Ok(str.toLowerCase()))

recursion

import { recursion, string, array, object } type Category = { name: string, categories: Category[] } const category = recursion<Category>(self => object({ name: string, categories: array(self) }))

Deriving the typescript type from the validator type

Note: this can be used with any combination of validators except ones using recursion.

Instead of using the derived type as your sole interface, use it to compare its compatibility with your handcrafted interfaces which will always be more readable in IDE's tooltips.

import { object, string, number } from 'validation.ts' const person = object({ name: string, age: number }) type PersonFromValidator = typeof person.T type Person = { name: string age: number }

Configuration

A Configuration object can be passed to modify the default behavior of the validators:

Configuration.transformObjectKeys

Transforms every keys of every objects before validating.

const burger = v.object({ options: v.object({ doubleBacon: v.boolean }) }) const ok = burger.validate({ options: { 'double_bacon': true } }, { transformObjectKeys: v.snakeCaseTransformation })

Thanks

To gcanti and his io-ts library which provided great inspiration.

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