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0.21.3

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evanw
published 0.21.2 •

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0.21.2

  • Correct this in field and accessor decorators (#3761)

    This release changes the value of this in initializers for class field and accessor decorators from the module-level this value to the appropriate this value for the decorated element (either the class or the instance). It was previously incorrect due to lack of test coverage. Here's an example of a decorator that doesn't work without this change:

    const dec = () => function() { this.bar = true }
    class Foo { @dec static foo }
    console.log(Foo.bar) // Should be "true"
    
  • Allow es2023 as a target environment (#3762)

    TypeScript recently added es2023 as a compilation target, so esbuild now supports this too. There is no difference between a target of es2022 and es2023 as far as esbuild is concerned since the 2023 edition of JavaScript doesn't introduce any new syntax features.

evanw
published 0.21.1 •

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0.21.1

  • Fix a regression with --keep-names (#3756)

    The previous release introduced a regression with the --keep-names setting and object literals with get/set accessor methods, in which case the generated code contained syntax errors. This release fixes the regression:

    // Original code
    x = { get y() {} }
    
    // Output from version 0.21.0 (with --keep-names)
    x = { get y: /* @__PURE__ */ __name(function() {
    }, "y") };
    
    // Output from this version (with --keep-names)
    x = { get y() {
    } };
    
evanw
published 0.21.0 •

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0.21.0

This release doesn't contain any deliberately-breaking changes. However, it contains a very complex new feature and while all of esbuild's tests pass, I would not be surprised if an important edge case turns out to be broken. So I'm releasing this as a breaking change release to avoid causing any trouble. As usual, make sure to test your code when you upgrade.

  • Implement the JavaScript decorators proposal (#104)

    With this release, esbuild now contains an implementation of the upcoming JavaScript decorators proposal. This is the same feature that shipped in TypeScript 5.0 and has been highly-requested on esbuild's issue tracker. You can read more about them in that blog post and in this other (now slightly outdated) extensive blog post here: https://2ality.com/2022/10/javascript-decorators.html. Here's a quick example:

    const log = (fn, context) => function() {
      console.log(`before ${context.name}`)
      const it = fn.apply(this, arguments)
      console.log(`after ${context.name}`)
      return it
    }
    
    class Foo {
      @log static foo() {
        console.log('in foo')
      }
    }
    
    // Logs "before foo", "in foo", "after foo"
    Foo.foo()
    

    Note that this feature is different than the existing "TypeScript experimental decorators" feature that esbuild already implements. It uses similar syntax but behaves very differently, and the two are not compatible (although it's sometimes possible to write decorators that work with both). TypeScript experimental decorators will still be supported by esbuild going forward as they have been around for a long time, are very widely used, and let you do certain things that are not possible with JavaScript decorators (such as decorating function parameters). By default esbuild will parse and transform JavaScript decorators, but you can tell esbuild to parse and transform TypeScript experimental decorators instead by setting "experimentalDecorators": true in your tsconfig.json file.

    Probably at least half of the work for this feature went into creating a test suite that exercises many of the proposal's edge cases: https://github.com/evanw/decorator-tests. It has given me a reasonable level of confidence that esbuild's initial implementation is acceptable. However, I don't have access to a significant sample of real code that uses JavaScript decorators. If you're currently using JavaScript decorators in a real code base, please try out esbuild's implementation and let me know if anything seems off.

    ⚠️ WARNING ⚠️

    This proposal has been in the works for a very long time (work began around 10 years ago in 2014) and it is finally getting close to becoming part of the JavaScript language. However, it's still a work in progress and isn't a part of JavaScript yet, so keep in mind that any code that uses JavaScript decorators may need to be updated as the feature continues to evolve. The decorators proposal is pretty close to its final form but it can and likely will undergo some small behavioral adjustments before it ends up becoming a part of the standard. If/when that happens, I will update esbuild's implementation to match the specification. I will not be supporting old versions of the specification.

  • Optimize the generated code for private methods

    Previously when lowering private methods for old browsers, esbuild would generate one WeakSet for each private method. This mirrors similar logic for generating one WeakSet for each private field. Using a separate WeakMap for private fields is necessary as their assignment can be observable:

    let it
    class Bar {
      constructor() {
        it = this
      }
    }
    class Foo extends Bar {
      #x = 1
      #y = null.foo
      static check() {
        console.log(#x in it, #y in it)
      }
    }
    try { new Foo } catch {}
    Foo.check()
    

    This prints true false because this partially-initialized instance has #x but not #y. In other words, it's not true that all class instances will always have all of their private fields. However, the assignment of private methods to a class instance is not observable. In other words, it's true that all class instances will always have all of their private methods. This means esbuild can lower private methods into code where all methods share a single WeakSet, which is smaller, faster, and uses less memory. Other JavaScript processing tools such as the TypeScript compiler already make this optimization. Here's what this change looks like:

    // Original code
    class Foo {
      #x() { return this.#x() }
      #y() { return this.#y() }
      #z() { return this.#z() }
    }
    
    // Old output (--supported:class-private-method=false)
    var _x, x_fn, _y, y_fn, _z, z_fn;
    class Foo {
      constructor() {
        __privateAdd(this, _x);
        __privateAdd(this, _y);
        __privateAdd(this, _z);
      }
    }
    _x = new WeakSet();
    x_fn = function() {
      return __privateMethod(this, _x, x_fn).call(this);
    };
    _y = new WeakSet();
    y_fn = function() {
      return __privateMethod(this, _y, y_fn).call(this);
    };
    _z = new WeakSet();
    z_fn = function() {
      return __privateMethod(this, _z, z_fn).call(this);
    };
    
    // New output (--supported:class-private-method=false)
    var _Foo_instances, x_fn, y_fn, z_fn;
    class Foo {
      constructor() {
        __privateAdd(this, _Foo_instances);
      }
    }
    _Foo_instances = new WeakSet();
    x_fn = function() {
      return __privateMethod(this, _Foo_instances, x_fn).call(this);
    };
    y_fn = function() {
      return __privateMethod(this, _Foo_instances, y_fn).call(this);
    };
    z_fn = function() {
      return __privateMethod(this, _Foo_instances, z_fn).call(this);
    };
    
  • Fix an obscure bug with lowering class members with computed property keys

    When class members that use newer syntax features are transformed for older target environments, they sometimes need to be relocated. However, care must be taken to not reorder any side effects caused by computed property keys. For example, the following code must evaluate a() then b() then c():

    class Foo {
      [a()]() {}
      [b()];
      static { c() }
    }
    

    Previously esbuild did this by shifting the computed property key forward to the next spot in the evaluation order. Classes evaluate all computed keys first and then all static class elements, so if the last computed key needs to be shifted, esbuild previously inserted a static block at start of the class body, ensuring it came before all other static class elements:

    var _a;
    class Foo {
      constructor() {
        __publicField(this, _a);
      }
      static {
        _a = b();
      }
      [a()]() {
      }
      static {
        c();
      }
    }
    

    However, this could cause esbuild to accidentally generate a syntax error if the computed property key contains code that isn't allowed in a static block, such as an await expression. With this release, esbuild fixes this problem by shifting the computed property key backward to the previous spot in the evaluation order instead, which may push it into the extends clause or even before the class itself:

    // Original code
    class Foo {
      [a()]() {}
      [await b()];
      static { c() }
    }
    
    // Old output (with --supported:class-field=false)
    var _a;
    class Foo {
      constructor() {
        __publicField(this, _a);
      }
      static {
        _a = await b();
      }
      [a()]() {
      }
      static {
        c();
      }
    }
    
    // New output (with --supported:class-field=false)
    var _a, _b;
    class Foo {
      constructor() {
        __publicField(this, _a);
      }
      [(_b = a(), _a = await b(), _b)]() {
      }
      static {
        c();
      }
    }
    
  • Fix some --keep-names edge cases

    The NamedEvaluation syntax-directed operation in the JavaScript specification gives certain anonymous expressions a name property depending on where they are in the syntax tree. For example, the following initializers convey a name value:

    var foo = function() {}
    var bar = class {}
    console.log(foo.name, bar.name)
    

    When you enable esbuild's --keep-names setting, esbuild generates additional code to represent this NamedEvaluation operation so that the value of the name property persists even when the identifiers are renamed (e.g. due to minification).

    However, I recently learned that esbuild's implementation of NamedEvaluation is missing a few cases. Specifically esbuild was missing property definitions, class initializers, logical-assignment operators. These cases should now all be handled:

    var obj = { foo: function() {} }
    class Foo0 { foo = function() {} }
    class Foo1 { static foo = function() {} }
    class Foo2 { accessor foo = function() {} }
    class Foo3 { static accessor foo = function() {} }
    foo ||= function() {}
    foo &&= function() {}
    foo ??= function() {}
    
evanw
published 0.20.2 •

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0.20.2

  • Support TypeScript experimental decorators on abstract class fields (#3684)

    With this release, you can now use TypeScript experimental decorators on abstract class fields. This was silently compiled incorrectly in esbuild 0.19.7 and below, and was an error from esbuild 0.19.8 to esbuild 0.20.1. Code such as the following should now work correctly:

    // Original code
    const log = (x: any, y: string) => console.log(y)
    abstract class Foo { @log abstract foo: string }
    new class extends Foo { foo = '' }
    
    // Old output (with --loader=ts --tsconfig-raw={\"compilerOptions\":{\"experimentalDecorators\":true}})
    const log = (x, y) => console.log(y);
    class Foo {
    }
    new class extends Foo {
      foo = "";
    }();
    
    // New output (with --loader=ts --tsconfig-raw={\"compilerOptions\":{\"experimentalDecorators\":true}})
    const log = (x, y) => console.log(y);
    class Foo {
    }
    __decorateClass([
      log
    ], Foo.prototype, "foo", 2);
    new class extends Foo {
      foo = "";
    }();
    
  • JSON loader now preserves __proto__ properties (#3700)

    Copying JSON source code into a JavaScript file will change its meaning if a JSON object contains the __proto__ key. A literal __proto__ property in a JavaScript object literal sets the prototype of the object instead of adding a property named __proto__, while a literal __proto__ property in a JSON object literal just adds a property named __proto__. With this release, esbuild will now work around this problem by converting JSON to JavaScript with a computed property key in this case:

    // Original code
    import data from 'data:application/json,{"__proto__":{"fail":true}}'
    if (Object.getPrototypeOf(data)?.fail) throw 'fail'
    
    // Old output (with --bundle)
    (() => {
      // <data:application/json,{"__proto__":{"fail":true}}>
      var json_proto_fail_true_default = { __proto__: { fail: true } };
    
      // entry.js
      if (Object.getPrototypeOf(json_proto_fail_true_default)?.fail)
        throw "fail";
    })();
    
    // New output (with --bundle)
    (() => {
      // <data:application/json,{"__proto__":{"fail":true}}>
      var json_proto_fail_true_default = { ["__proto__"]: { fail: true } };
    
      // example.mjs
      if (Object.getPrototypeOf(json_proto_fail_true_default)?.fail)
        throw "fail";
    })();
    
  • Improve dead code removal of switch statements (#3659)

    With this release, esbuild will now remove switch statements in branches when minifying if they are known to never be evaluated:

    // Original code
    if (true) foo(); else switch (bar) { case 1: baz(); break }
    
    // Old output (with --minify)
    if(1)foo();else switch(bar){case 1:}
    
    // New output (with --minify)
    foo();
    
  • Empty enums should behave like an object literal (#3657)

    TypeScript allows you to create an empty enum and add properties to it at run time. While people usually use an empty object literal for this instead of a TypeScript enum, esbuild's enum transform didn't anticipate this use case and generated undefined instead of {} for an empty enum. With this release, you can now use an empty enum to generate an empty object literal.

    // Original code
    enum Foo {}
    
    // Old output (with --loader=ts)
    var Foo = /* @__PURE__ */ ((Foo2) => {
    })(Foo || {});
    
    // New output (with --loader=ts)
    var Foo = /* @__PURE__ */ ((Foo2) => {
      return Foo2;
    })(Foo || {});
    
  • Handle Yarn Plug'n'Play edge case with tsconfig.json (#3698)

    Previously a tsconfig.json file that extends another file in a package with an exports map failed to work when Yarn's Plug'n'Play resolution was active. This edge case should work now starting with this release.

  • Work around issues with Deno 1.31+ (#3682)

    Version 0.20.0 of esbuild changed how the esbuild child process is run in esbuild's API for Deno. Previously it used Deno.run but that API is being removed in favor of Deno.Command. As part of this change, esbuild is now calling the new unref function on esbuild's long-lived child process, which is supposed to allow Deno to exit when your code has finished running even though the child process is still around (previously you had to explicitly call esbuild's stop() function to terminate the child process for Deno to be able to exit).

    However, this introduced a problem for Deno's testing API which now fails some tests that use esbuild with error: Promise resolution is still pending but the event loop has already resolved. It's unclear to me why this is happening. The call to unref was recommended by someone on the Deno core team, and calling Node's equivalent unref API has been working fine for esbuild in Node for a long time. It could be that I'm using it incorrectly, or that there's some reference counting and/or garbage collection bug in Deno's internals, or that Deno's unref just works differently than Node's unref. In any case, it's not good for Deno tests that use esbuild to be failing.

    In this release, I am removing the call to unref to fix this issue. This means that you will now have to call esbuild's stop() function to allow Deno to exit, just like you did before esbuild version 0.20.0 when this regression was introduced.

    Note: This regression wasn't caught earlier because Deno doesn't seem to fail tests that have outstanding setTimeout calls, which esbuild's test harness was using to enforce a maximum test runtime. Adding a setTimeout was allowing esbuild's Deno tests to succeed. So this regression doesn't necessarily apply to all people using tests in Deno.

evanw
published 0.20.1 •

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0.20.1

  • Fix a bug with the CSS nesting transform (#3648)

    This release fixes a bug with the CSS nesting transform for older browsers where the generated CSS could be incorrect if a selector list contained a pseudo element followed by another selector. The bug was caused by incorrectly mutating the parent rule's selector list when filtering out pseudo elements for the child rules:

    /* Original code */
    .foo {
      &:after,
      & .bar {
        color: red;
      }
    }
    
    /* Old output (with --supported:nesting=false) */
    .foo .bar,
    .foo .bar {
      color: red;
    }
    
    /* New output (with --supported:nesting=false) */
    .foo:after,
    .foo .bar {
      color: red;
    }
    
  • Constant folding for JavaScript inequality operators (#3645)

    This release introduces constant folding for the < > <= >= operators. The minifier will now replace these operators with true or false when both sides are compile-time numeric or string constants:

    // Original code
    console.log(1 < 2, '🍕' > '🧀')
    
    // Old output (with --minify)
    console.log(1<2,"🍕">"🧀");
    
    // New output (with --minify)
    console.log(!0,!1);
    
  • Better handling of __proto__ edge cases (#3651)

    JavaScript object literal syntax contains a special case where a non-computed property with a key of __proto__ sets the prototype of the object. This does not apply to computed properties or to properties that use the shorthand property syntax introduced in ES6. Previously esbuild didn't correctly preserve the "sets the prototype" status of properties inside an object literal, meaning a property that sets the prototype could accidentally be transformed into one that doesn't and vice versa. This has now been fixed:

    // Original code
    function foo(__proto__) {
      return { __proto__: __proto__ } // Note: sets the prototype
    }
    function bar(__proto__, proto) {
      {
        let __proto__ = proto
        return { __proto__ } // Note: doesn't set the prototype
      }
    }
    
    // Old output
    function foo(__proto__) {
      return { __proto__ }; // Note: no longer sets the prototype (WRONG)
    }
    function bar(__proto__, proto) {
      {
        let __proto__2 = proto;
        return { __proto__: __proto__2 }; // Note: now sets the prototype (WRONG)
      }
    }
    
    // New output
    function foo(__proto__) {
      return { __proto__: __proto__ }; // Note: sets the prototype (correct)
    }
    function bar(__proto__, proto) {
      {
        let __proto__2 = proto;
        return { ["__proto__"]: __proto__2 }; // Note: doesn't set the prototype (correct)
      }
    }
    
  • Fix cross-platform non-determinism with CSS color space transformations (#3650)

    The Go compiler takes advantage of "fused multiply and add" (FMA) instructions on certain processors which do the operation x*y + z without intermediate rounding. This causes esbuild's CSS color space math to differ on different processors (currently ppc64le and s390x), which breaks esbuild's guarantee of deterministic output. To avoid this, esbuild's color space math now inserts a float64() cast around every single math operation. This tells the Go compiler not to use the FMA optimization.

  • Fix a crash when resolving a path from a directory that doesn't exist (#3634)

    This release fixes a regression where esbuild could crash when resolving an absolute path if the source directory for the path resolution operation doesn't exist. While this situation doesn't normally come up, it could come up when running esbuild concurrently with another operation that mutates the file system as esbuild is doing a build (such as using git to switch branches). The underlying problem was a regression that was introduced in version 0.18.0.

evanw
published 0.20.0 •

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0.20.0

This release deliberately contains backwards-incompatible changes. To avoid automatically picking up releases like this, you should either be pinning the exact version of esbuild in your package.json file (recommended) or be using a version range syntax that only accepts patch upgrades such as ^0.19.0 or ~0.19.0. See npm's documentation about semver for more information.

This time there is only one breaking change, and it only matters for people using Deno. Deno tests that use esbuild will now fail unless you make the change described below.

  • Work around API deprecations in Deno 1.40.x (#3609, #3611)

    Deno 1.40.0 was just released and introduced run-time warnings about certain APIs that esbuild uses. With this release, esbuild will work around these run-time warnings by using newer APIs if they are present and falling back to the original APIs otherwise. This should avoid the warnings without breaking compatibility with older versions of Deno.

    Unfortunately, doing this introduces a breaking change. The newer child process APIs lack a way to synchronously terminate esbuild's child process, so calling esbuild.stop() from within a Deno test is no longer sufficient to prevent Deno from failing a test that uses esbuild's API (Deno fails tests that create a child process without killing it before the test ends). To work around this, esbuild's stop() function has been changed to return a promise, and you now have to change esbuild.stop() to await esbuild.stop() in all of your Deno tests.

  • Reorder implicit file extensions within node_modules (#3341, #3608)

    In version 0.18.0, esbuild changed the behavior of implicit file extensions within node_modules directories (i.e. in published packages) to prefer .js over .ts even when the --resolve-extensions= order prefers .ts over .js (which it does by default). However, doing that also accidentally made esbuild prefer .css over .ts, which caused problems for people that published packages containing both TypeScript and CSS in files with the same name.

    With this release, esbuild will reorder TypeScript file extensions immediately after the last JavaScript file extensions in the implicit file extension order instead of putting them at the end of the order. Specifically the default implicit file extension order is .tsx,.ts,.jsx,.js,.css,.json which used to become .jsx,.js,.css,.json,.tsx,.ts in node_modules directories. With this release it will now become .jsx,.js,.tsx,.ts,.css,.json instead.

    Why even rewrite the implicit file extension order at all? One reason is because the .js file is more likely to behave correctly than the .ts file. The behavior of the .ts file may depend on tsconfig.json and the tsconfig.json file may not even be published, or may use extends to refer to a base tsconfig.json file that wasn't published. People can get into this situation when they forget to add all .ts files to their .npmignore file before publishing to npm. Picking .js over .ts helps make it more likely that resulting bundle will behave correctly.

evanw
published 0.19.12 •

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0.19.12

  • The "preserve" JSX mode now preserves JSX text verbatim (#3605)

    The JSX specification deliberately doesn't specify how JSX text is supposed to be interpreted and there is no canonical way to interpret JSX text. Two most popular interpretations are Babel and TypeScript. Yes they are different (esbuild deliberately follows TypeScript by the way).

    Previously esbuild normalized text to the TypeScript interpretation when the "preserve" JSX mode is active. However, "preserve" should arguably reproduce the original JSX text verbatim so that whatever JSX transform runs after esbuild is free to interpret it however it wants. So with this release, esbuild will now pass JSX text through unmodified:

    // Original code
    let el =
      <a href={'/'} title='&apos;&quot;'> some text
        {foo}
          more text </a>
    
    // Old output (with --loader=jsx --jsx=preserve)
    let el = <a href="/" title={`'"`}>
      {" some text"}
      {foo}
      {"more text "}
    </a>;
    
    // New output (with --loader=jsx --jsx=preserve)
    let el = <a href={"/"} title='&apos;&quot;'> some text
        {foo}
          more text </a>;
    
  • Allow JSX elements as JSX attribute values

    JSX has an obscure feature where you can use JSX elements in attribute position without surrounding them with {...}. It looks like this:

    let el = <div data-ab=<><a/><b/></>/>;
    

    I think I originally didn't implement it even though it's part of the JSX specification because it previously didn't work in TypeScript (and potentially also in Babel?). However, support for it was silently added in TypeScript 4.8 without me noticing and Babel has also since fixed their bugs regarding this feature. So I'm adding it to esbuild too now that I know it's widely supported.

    Keep in mind that there is some ongoing discussion about removing this feature from JSX. I agree that the syntax seems out of place (it does away with the elegance of "JSX is basically just XML with {...} escapes" for something arguably harder to read, which doesn't seem like a good trade-off), but it's in the specification and TypeScript and Babel both implement it so I'm going to have esbuild implement it too. However, I reserve the right to remove it from esbuild if it's ever removed from the specification in the future. So use it with caution.

  • Fix a bug with TypeScript type parsing (#3574)

    This release fixes a bug with esbuild's TypeScript parser where a conditional type containing a union type that ends with an infer type that ends with a constraint could fail to parse. This was caused by the "don't parse a conditional type" flag not getting passed through the union type parser. Here's an example of valid TypeScript code that previously failed to parse correctly:

    type InferUnion<T> = T extends { a: infer U extends number } | infer U extends number ? U : never
    
evanw
published 0.19.11 •

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0.19.11

  • Fix TypeScript-specific class transform edge case (#3559)

    The previous release introduced an optimization that avoided transforming super() in the class constructor for TypeScript code compiled with useDefineForClassFields set to false if all class instance fields have no initializers. The rationale was that in this case, all class instance fields are omitted in the output so no changes to the constructor are needed. However, if all of this is the case and there are #private instance fields with initializers, those private instance field initializers were still being moved into the constructor. This was problematic because they were being inserted before the call to super() (since super() is now no longer transformed in that case). This release introduces an additional optimization that avoids moving the private instance field initializers into the constructor in this edge case, which generates smaller code, matches the TypeScript compiler's output more closely, and avoids this bug:

    // Original code
    class Foo extends Bar {
      #private = 1;
      public: any;
      constructor() {
        super();
      }
    }
    
    // Old output (with esbuild v0.19.9)
    class Foo extends Bar {
      constructor() {
        super();
        this.#private = 1;
      }
      #private;
    }
    
    // Old output (with esbuild v0.19.10)
    class Foo extends Bar {
      constructor() {
        this.#private = 1;
        super();
      }
      #private;
    }
    
    // New output
    class Foo extends Bar {
      #private = 1;
      constructor() {
        super();
      }
    }
    
  • Minifier: allow reording a primitive past a side-effect (#3568)

    The minifier previously allowed reordering a side-effect past a primitive, but didn't handle the case of reordering a primitive past a side-effect. This additional case is now handled:

    // Original code
    function f() {
      let x = false;
      let y = x;
      const boolean = y;
      let frag = $.template(`<p contenteditable="${boolean}">hello world</p>`);
      return frag;
    }
    
    // Old output (with --minify)
    function f(){const e=!1;return $.template(`<p contenteditable="${e}">hello world</p>`)}
    
    // New output (with --minify)
    function f(){return $.template('<p contenteditable="false">hello world</p>')}
    
  • Minifier: consider properties named using known Symbol instances to be side-effect free (#3561)

    Many things in JavaScript can have side effects including property accesses and ToString operations, so using a symbol such as Symbol.iterator as a computed property name is not obviously side-effect free. This release adds a special case for known Symbol instances so that they are considered side-effect free when used as property names. For example, this class declaration will now be considered side-effect free:

    class Foo {
      *[Symbol.iterator]() {
      }
    }
    
  • Provide the stop() API in node to exit esbuild's child process (#3558)

    You can now call stop() in esbuild's node API to exit esbuild's child process to reclaim the resources used. It only makes sense to do this for a long-lived node process when you know you will no longer be making any more esbuild API calls. It is not necessary to call this to allow node to exit, and it's advantageous to not call this in between calls to esbuild's API as sharing a single long-lived esbuild child process is more efficient than re-creating a new esbuild child process for every API call. This API call used to exist but was removed in version 0.9.0. This release adds it back due to a user request.

evanw
published 0.19.10 •

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0.19.10

  • Fix glob imports in TypeScript files (#3319)

    This release fixes a problem where bundling a TypeScript file containing a glob import could emit a call to a helper function that doesn't exist. The problem happened because esbuild's TypeScript transformation removes unused imports (which is required for correctness, as they may be type-only imports) and esbuild's glob import transformation wasn't correctly marking the imported helper function as used. This wasn't caught earlier because most of esbuild's glob import tests were written in JavaScript, not in TypeScript.

  • Fix require() glob imports with bundling disabled (#3546)

    Previously require() calls containing glob imports were incorrectly transformed when bundling was disabled. All glob imports should only be transformed when bundling is enabled. This bug has been fixed.

  • Fix a panic when transforming optional chaining with define (#3551, #3554)

    This release fixes a case where esbuild could crash with a panic, which was triggered by using define to replace an expression containing an optional chain. Here is an example:

    // Original code
    console.log(process?.env.SHELL)
    
    // Old output (with --define:process.env={})
    /* panic: Internal error (while parsing "<stdin>") */
    
    // New output (with --define:process.env={})
    var define_process_env_default = {};
    console.log(define_process_env_default.SHELL);
    

    This fix was contributed by @hi-ogawa.

  • Work around a bug in node's CommonJS export name detector (#3544)

    The export names of a CommonJS module are dynamically-determined at run time because CommonJS exports are properties on a mutable object. But the export names of an ES module are statically-determined at module instantiation time by using import and export syntax and cannot be changed at run time.

    When you import a CommonJS module into an ES module in node, node scans over the source code to attempt to detect the set of export names that the CommonJS module will end up using. That statically-determined set of names is used as the set of names that the ES module is allowed to import at module instantiation time. However, this scan appears to have bugs (or at least, can cause false positives) because it doesn't appear to do any scope analysis. Node will incorrectly consider the module to export something even if the assignment is done to a local variable instead of to the module-level exports object. For example:

    // confuseNode.js
    exports.confuseNode = function(exports) {
      // If this local is called "exports", node incorrectly
      // thinks this file has an export called "notAnExport".
      exports.notAnExport = function() {
      };
    };
    

    You can see that node incorrectly thinks the file confuseNode.js has an export called notAnExport when that file is loaded in an ES module context:

    $ node -e 'import("./confuseNode.js").then(console.log)'
    [Module: null prototype] {
      confuseNode: [Function (anonymous)],
      default: { confuseNode: [Function (anonymous)] },
      notAnExport: undefined
    }
    

    To avoid this, esbuild will now rename local variables that use the names exports and module when generating CommonJS output for the node platform.

  • Fix the return value of esbuild's super() shim (#3538)

    Some people write constructor methods that use the return value of super() instead of using this. This isn't too common because TypeScript doesn't let you do that but it can come up when writing JavaScript. Previously esbuild's class lowering transform incorrectly transformed the return value of super() into undefined. With this release, the return value of super() will now be this instead:

    // Original code
    class Foo extends Object {
      field
      constructor() {
        console.log(typeof super())
      }
    }
    new Foo
    
    // Old output (with --target=es6)
    class Foo extends Object {
      constructor() {
        var __super = (...args) => {
          super(...args);
          __publicField(this, "field");
        };
        console.log(typeof __super());
      }
    }
    new Foo();
    
    // New output (with --target=es6)
    class Foo extends Object {
      constructor() {
        var __super = (...args) => {
          super(...args);
          __publicField(this, "field");
          return this;
        };
        console.log(typeof __super());
      }
    }
    new Foo();
    
  • Terminate the Go GC when esbuild's stop() API is called (#3552)

    If you use esbuild with WebAssembly and pass the worker: false flag to esbuild.initialize(), then esbuild will run the WebAssembly module on the main thread. If you do this within a Deno test and that test calls esbuild.stop() to clean up esbuild's resources, Deno may complain that a setTimeout() call lasted past the end of the test. This happens when the Go is in the middle of a garbage collection pass and has scheduled additional ongoing garbage collection work. Normally calling esbuild.stop() will terminate the web worker that the WebAssembly module runs in, which will terminate the Go GC, but that doesn't happen if you disable the web worker with worker: false.

    With this release, esbuild will now attempt to terminate the Go GC in this edge case by calling clearTimeout() on these pending timeouts.

  • Apply /* @__NO_SIDE_EFFECTS__ */ on tagged template literals (#3511)

    Tagged template literals that reference functions annotated with a @__NO_SIDE_EFFECTS__ comment are now able to be removed via tree-shaking if the result is unused. This is a convention from Rollup. Here is an example:

    // Original code
    const html = /* @__NO_SIDE_EFFECTS__ */ (a, ...b) => ({ a, b })
    html`<a>remove</a>`
    x = html`<b>keep</b>`
    
    // Old output (with --tree-shaking=true)
    const html = /* @__NO_SIDE_EFFECTS__ */ (a, ...b) => ({ a, b });
    html`<a>remove</a>`;
    x = html`<b>keep</b>`;
    
    // New output (with --tree-shaking=true)
    const html = /* @__NO_SIDE_EFFECTS__ */ (a, ...b) => ({ a, b });
    x = html`<b>keep</b>`;
    

    Note that this feature currently only works within a single file, so it's not especially useful. This feature does not yet work across separate files. I still recommend using @__PURE__ annotations instead of this feature, as they have wider tooling support. The drawback of course is that @__PURE__ annotations need to be added at each call site, not at the declaration, and for non-call expressions such as template literals you need to wrap the expression in an IIFE (immediately-invoked function expression) to create a call expression to apply the @__PURE__ annotation to.

  • Publish builds for IBM AIX PowerPC 64-bit (#3549)

    This release publishes a binary executable to npm for IBM AIX PowerPC 64-bit, which means that in theory esbuild can now be installed in that environment with npm install esbuild. This hasn't actually been tested yet. If you have access to such a system, it would be helpful to confirm whether or not doing this actually works.

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